top ten

Best Ice-Cream in Mtl, Mannequins and Shenanigans by Nasuna Stuart-Ulin

Hello and thanks to all my wonderful supporters and followers! - your regular programming of travel photos, anecdotes and mini-essays will continue after this, with more content than ever... but in the meantime:

Above is a re-post of my entry into the contest, for those who are just joining me on this journey, and right below that - my first vlog as a Top 10 finalist for My Biggest Baddest Bucket List!

A huge thanks to everybody out there who voted for me in the first round, but did you know that you can do so again?

You, yes, you, can make all the difference in my quest for the final 6 month trip of a lifetime & $50,000, which I intend to distribute amongst worthy NGOs I encounter on my travels. If you haven't already done so, AND you liked my entry, AND you'd like to see the money go to something other than the most expensive chandelier I can find, then please click HERE and click on "support and follow" next to the video :

http://www.mydestination.com/users/nasuna/bbb#tab

...And one more thing... if any of you know anyone in the tourism, media and/or mannequin manufacturing business, please be in touch, as I'll be needing all the publicity I can get!

I can now be found on:

Twitter @NasunaPhoto & Instagram: nasunaphoto & Youtube: Nasuna Stuart-Ulin

Thanks again!

Siesta Eternal by Nasuna Stuart-Ulin

mom_hammock

My mother naps, wrapped in a hammock in Mexico. She is alive and well, but here, she seems to sleep eternally.

The other day I watched the film Amour, which won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and best foreign film at the Oscars this year. It shed light on the final stages of life, which I think few people dwell on until they find themselves there, and then they haven’t got a choice. That’s the scariest thing – getting to a place where you no longer have a say… where you can’t assert your identity. What does it feel like to lose control over your own existence?

I listened to a really interesting podcast this week by Radiolab called “The Bitter End” which wrestled with this question. They found that there’s a surprising gap between what doctors will do for us when death is near, and what doctors want done for themselves. While most of us would say: save my life at any cost, doctors know the invasiveness of many life-prolonging interventions. The majority opt for an earlier death soothed by painkillers, rather than a few extra months with a breathing tube. A study done in 1996 found that TV medical dramas depict CPR as having a survival rate of 75%, but I was stunned to learn that in reality, it's only 8%! And of that, only 3% return to a normal quality of life. No wonder our perception is skewed.

In the end, all living things share the same inescapable fate. I guess doctors think about that more than most. To me, the thought is simultaneously comforting and terrifying – the idea that we’re all in it together, and yet

completely

alone.

… but what can you do?